American

Philip Guston

Philip Guston, born Phillip Goldstein, was a painter and printmaker in the New York School, which included many of the abstract expressionists, such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. In the late 1960s Guston helped to lead a transition from abstract expressionism to neo-expressionism in painting, abandoning the so-called "pure abstraction" of abstract expressionism in favor of more cartoonish renderings of various personal symbols and objects.

Robert Henri

Robert Henri was an American painter and teacher. He was a leading figure of the Ashcan School of American realism and an organizer of the group known as "The Eight," a loose association of artists who protested the restrictive exhibition practices of the powerful, conservative National Academy of Design.

Clyfford Still

Clyfford Still was an American painter, and one of the leading figures in the first generation of Abstract Expressionists, who developed a new, powerful approach to painting in the years immediately following World War II. Still has been credited with laying the groundwork for the movement, as his shift from representational to abstract painting occurred between 1938 and 1942, earlier than his colleagues like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, who continued to paint in figurative-surrealist styles well into the 1940s.

Edward Francis Paschke

Edward Francis Paschke was a Polish American painter. His childhood interest in animation and cartoons, as well as his father's creativity in wood carving and construction, led him toward a career in art. As a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago he was influenced by many artists featured in the Museum's special exhibitions, in particular the work of Gauguin, Picasso and Seurat.

Henry Ossawa Tanner

Henry Ossawa Tanner was an American artist. He was the first African-American painter to gain international acclaim. He moved to Paris in 1891 to study, and decided to stay there, being readily accepted in French artistic circles. His painting entitled Daniel in the Lions' Den was accepted into the 1896 Salon.

Robert Walter Weir

Robert Walter Weir was an American artist and educator. He is considered a painter of the Hudson River School. Weir was elected to the National Academy of Design in 1829, and an instructor at the United States Military Academy. His best-known works are Embarkation of the Pilgrims (in the United States Capitol rotunda at Washington, D.C.) and Landing of Hendrik Hudson.

Margaret Bourke-White

Margaret Bourke-White was an American photographer and documentary photographer. She is best known as the first foreign photographer permitted to take pictures of Soviet industry, the firsthand American female war photojournalist, and the first female photographer for Henry Luce's Life magazine, where her photograph appeared on the first cover. She died of Parkinson's disease about eighteen years after she developed her first symptoms.

Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller

Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller was an African-American artist, notable for her art celebrating Afrocentric themes. She was known as a multi-talented artist who wrote poetry, painted, and sculpted. At the turn of the twentieth century, she was a well-known sculptor in Paris before her return to the United States. She was a protege of Auguste Rodin, and has been described as "one of the most imaginative Black artists of her generation. Fuller created work with strong social commentary and became a forerunner of the Harlem Renaissance, a movement promoting African-American art.

Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright was an American architect, interior designer, writer, and educator, who designed more than 1,000 structures, 532 of which were completed. Wright believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture. This philosophy was best exemplified by Fallingwater (1935), which has been called "the best all-time work of American architecture".

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